Arrival to the island of Mön

It’s that easy to travel to the island of Mön.

The island of Mön is not far from Germany. You can even see Mön from the island of Hiddensee. Nevertheless, the journey from Germany to Denmark takes time.

Ferry Rostock Denmark

If you want to travel to Mön from the eastern federal states, you should board the Skandlines ferry Rostock Gedser (Denmark) for the crossing. The ferry to Gedser starts at the Rostock ferry terminal at 1:00 p.m., 3:00 p.m. or 5:00 p.m. The one-way trip by car and 2 people costs 108 euros. You can enjoy great food on the ferry.

Just ten minutes from the end of the Danish peninsula, we find Gedser Odde. The beach is a popular spot for leisure and fishing and has long been a meeting place for vacationers and weekenders. Gedser Odde is a free-standing rock face on the southern end of the island of Falster in Denmark. The geological formations narrow to a point that geographically makes it the southernmost marker of Denmark. There is a ferry to Rostock, Germany from the nearby town of Gedser, making it a regional destination for tourists and locals alike who can bathe in the area’s healing salt water.

The Queen Alexandrine Bridge connects Zealand (Gedser) and Møn.

The crossing takes only 1 hour and 45 minutes. In Gedser (Denmark) you leave the ferry and simply drive to the island of Mön using your GPS or following the signs. The drive to Mön takes just over an hour. A bridge leads to the island of Mön, so that no further ferry crossing is necessary here.


Left:>> Book Skandlines tickets

Booking the trip from Rostock to Gedser -> Mön

Information about ferry crossing with Skandlines

  • On board the ferry you can pay with Visa card, American Express, Mastercard or Diners Club.
  • You can easily pay with the euro or Danish, Swedish or Norwegian kroner on board the ferry.
  • Dogs and other small pets are allowed on the ferry.
  • You can also take the ferry as a pedestrian. You can get to the ferry terminal by bus from Rostock Central Station. All information here:
    www.rsag-online.de
  • If you want to dine relaxed on the ferry, you can reserve a table in advance.
  • You can take alcohol and cigarettes with you on the ferry to Denmark, but you have to observe the maximum import limits.

How to get to the ferry terminal in Rostock

Regardless of whether you are coming from Berlin or Hamburg / Lübeck. Follow the A19 to the end and you will find the ferry terminal. This is located in the Rostock harbor. Please do not go to Warnemünde. Only cruise ships start here.

Arrival on the island of Mön
How to get to the ferry terminal. Attention: The ferry terminal is not at the cruise terminal.

With this description you can easily and comfortably get to your holiday homes on the Danish island of Mön. Be it in Möns Klint, Stege or elsewhere on Mön.

Some information about Gedser Odde

Just ten minutes from the end of the Danish peninsula, we find Gedser Odde. The beach is a popular spot for leisure and fishing and has long been a meeting place for vacationers and weekenders. Gedser Odde is a free-standing rock face on the southern end of the island of Falster in Denmark. The geological formations narrow to a point that geographically makes it the southernmost marker of Denmark. There is a ferry to Rostock, Germany from the nearby town of Gedser, making it a regional destination for tourists and locals who can bathe in the area’s healing salt water.

About Skandlines

The ferry company Skandlines has seen a surge in bookings lately as many people get on the next ship to Denmark. There are many reasons people go there, but even if you don’t flee the winter, you can still enjoy the fun that awaits.

From museums to nature parks, Skandlines ferries will get you there. Denmark is easy to explore – and if this winter has taught us something, time out is very important.

Skandlines ferries are typically an hour long, so perfect if you are traveling with children. And the company also transports bicycles, cars and campers.

We wish you a nice and relaxed journey to Mön.

Photo bridge: © Daniel Villadsen